Properties

CAS Number7440-13-3
PubChem CIDna
Atomic Radius163
Atomic Volume15
Atomic Weight231.036
Blockf
Boiling Point4,027
Bulk Modulus
CategoryActinides
Crystal StructureCentered Tetragonal
ColorSilver
Covalent Radius200
Density15.37
Electrical Resistivity
Electron Configuration[Rn] 5f2 6d1 7s2
Electrons per shell2, 8, 18, 32, 20, 9, 2
Electronegativity1.5
Electrons91
Groupna
Heat of Fusion15
Heat of Vaporization470
Ionization Potential5.89
Magnetic Ordering
Magnetic Susceptibility
Mass231.036
Mass Number91
Melting Point1,568
NameProtactinium
Neutrons140
Atomic Number231
Oxidation States3, 4, 5
Period7
PhaseSolid
Poisson Ratio
Protons91
Shear Modulus
Specific Heat Capacity-
SymbolPa
Thermal Conductivity0.47
Van der Waals radius
Young's Modulus
Abundance
Abundance in Earth's crust9.9×10-13%
Abundance in Universena
Pa Protactinium 91 231.03588 7 f 91 1570.0 4000.0 [Rn] 5f2 6d1 7s2 2 8 18 32 20 9 2 15.4 9.9E-13% Silver Orthorhombic 1.5 {"1":"568"} 568 +5,4 1.61 15.0 47.0 1 32788 y 47279.y AlphaEmission Solid, Conductor, Actinide, Radioactive, Natural PRO-tak-tin-eh-em Very rare, silvery-white, extremely radioactive metal. It has no significant commercial applications. Does not occur in nature. Found among fission products of uranium, thorium, and plutonium. 3nZB4u34q98 Protactinium
In 1908, Japanese chemist Masataka Ogawa announced that he discovered the 43rd element.

However, later analysis indicated the presence of rhenium (element 75), not element 43.

In 1922, Walter Noddack, Ida Eva Tacke and Otto Berg announced its separation from gadolinite and gave it the present name. From the Latin word Rhenus meaning Rhine 91 1913 Otto Hahn, Lise Meitner, Frederick Soddy, John Cranston Germany, England From the Greek word "protos" meaning "first"

Isotopes of Rhenium

Standard Atomic Weight

231.03588(2)

Stable Isotopes

231Pa

Unstable Isotopes

212Pa 213Pa 214Pa 215Pa 216Pa 217Pa 218Pa 219Pa 220Pa 221Pa 222Pa 223Pa 224Pa 225Pa 226Pa 227Pa 228Pa 229Pa 230Pa 232Pa 233Pa 234Pa 235Pa 236Pa 237Pa 238Pa 239Pa 240Pa

Very little is known about the toxicity of rhenium
Chile has the world's largest rhenium reserves
Rhenium is widely used as filaments for mass spectrographs and ion gauges.

It is also used with platinum as catalysts in the production of lead-free, high-octane gasoline.

Nickel-based superalloys of rhenium are used in the combustion chambers, turbine blades, and exhaust nozzles of jet engines.