Properties

CAS Number7440-60-0
PubChem CID23988
Atomic Radius176
Atomic Volume18.7
Atomic Weight164.93
Blockf
Boiling Point2,720
Bulk Modulus
CategoryLanthanides
Crystal StructureSimple Hexagonal
ColorSilver
Covalent Radius192
Density8.795
Electrical Resistivity
Electron Configuration[Xe] 4f11 6s2
Electrons per shell2, 8, 18, 29, 8, 2
Electronegativity1.23
Electrons67
Groupna
Heat of Fusion17
Heat of Vaporization265
Ionization Potential6.022
Magnetic Ordering
Magnetic Susceptibility
Mass164.93
Mass Number67
Melting Point1,461
NameHolmium
Neutrons98
Atomic Number165
Oxidation States3
Period6
PhaseSolid
Poisson Ratio
Protons67
Shear Modulus
Specific Heat Capacity0.165
SymbolHo
Thermal Conductivity0.162
Van der Waals radius
Young's Modulus
Abundance
Abundance in Earth's crust0.00012%
Abundance in Universe5×10-8%
Ho Holmium 67 164.93032 6 f 67 1474.0 2700.0 [Xe] 4f11 6s2 2 8 18 29 8 2 8.8 0.00012% Silver Hexagonal 1.2 {"1":"581.0","2":"1140","3":"2204","4":"4100"} 581 50 3 1.79 18.7 11.06 251.04 0.165 16.2 132.K 0 Solid, Paramagnetic, Conductor, Lanthanide, Stable, Natural HOLE-mi-em Fairly soft, malleable, lustrous, silvery metal. It has very few practical applications; however, it has some unusual magnetic properties that offer some hope for future applications. Occurs in gadolinite. Most often from monazite which is often 50% rare earth and typically 0.05% holmium. 3ERc-vPLMUs Holmium
Iodine was discovered by French chemist Bernard Courtois in 1811.

He treated the liquor obtained from the extraction of kelp, with sulfuric acid to produce a vapour with a violet color.

In 1812, Joseph Louis Gay-Lussac demonstrated that iodine was an element and its chemical relationship to chlorine. From the Greek word iodes, violet 67 1878 J. L. Soret and Delafontaine Switzerland From the Greek word "Holmia" meaning "Sweden"

Isotopes of Iodine

Standard Atomic Weight

164.93033(2)

Stable Isotopes

165Ho

Unstable Isotopes

140Ho 141Ho 142Ho 143Ho 144Ho 145Ho 146Ho 147Ho 148Ho 149Ho 150Ho 151Ho 152Ho 153Ho 154Ho 155Ho 156Ho 157Ho 158Ho 159Ho 160Ho 161Ho 162Ho 163Ho 164Ho 166Ho 167Ho 168Ho 169Ho 170Ho 171Ho 172Ho 173Ho 174Ho 175Ho

Elemental iodine is toxic if taken orally
Kelp was the main source of natural iodine in the 18th and 19th centuries
Iodine compounds are important in organic chemistry and very useful in medicine.

A solution containing potassium iodide and iodine in alcohol is used to disinfect external wounds.

Silver iodide is a major ingredient to traditional photographic film.

Iodine is added to table salt to prevent thyroid disease.